Picking up those brushes again.

Hi and welcome to the occasional mutterings of Dave Doc, a military modeller and some time gamer. Gaming and model making has given me a real education, History & Geography(obvious really), Artistry, Politics, Economics, Logistics, Project Management -you try building miniature armies without the last 3.

I will use the blog to record my creations & the odd occasion I actually do some gaming.

I have always been inspired by the aesthetic side of gaming. Playing on well constructed terrain using excellently painted units is always a joy.

Monday, 10 December 2012

Red Air Force - part 1

Well here is a little aircraft recognition test for you. This latest little project is for Gerry over at   The Situation Room . So can you tell your Yak9 from your Lagg3 , your Sturmovick from your PE2. Prize for anyone who can spot the all of the types. The models are by Command Decision Miniatures and all 1/144th scale.


Its been a while since the airbrush has had an outing, so I have made a start on the 25 aircraft with a main
undercoat of green

The airbrush I use is an IWATA Eclipse High Precision. Its a double action brush  which means you can control the airflow pressure and the width of the spray with the trigger. Not an easy skill at first , but once you get used to it easy enough. The paint cup is transferable side to side and I also have a range of large pots which I prepare with paint , thinners, cleaner etc  and then just swap over as required. 


 If you are starting out with an airbrush you can choose a single action which give you a fixed spray - something like a Badger 200 a good solid starter. In case you don't know the difference between a spraygun and an airbrush . A spraygun sprays air into which paint is drawn by the airflow externally from the spray nozzle. An Airbrush mixes air and paint within the body of the brush and sprays through the nozzle which means as you can control both paint flow and air pressure you can get a fine line of spray if you want.

Of course if you going in for any large scale work a compressor is essential - and this is mine - it will happily hammer away all afternoon - its fitted with pressure reduction valve as well which gives me extra control to reduce the air into the brush - useful for doing camo!!


Anyway off to mix more paint

8 comments:

  1. Now that is a tidy bit of kit, never really had a go at one myself, but that doesn't stop me thinking that I want one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you know you want to .. a nice letter to Santa required

      Delete
  2. I want one too!!! Lets hope Santa brings us both one!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. nice kit I must dig mine out agian soon.
    Peace James

    ReplyDelete
  4. My Dad had one, but it's a bit of kit that vanished after he died. I think Mum must have thrown it out, she can't remember so it's possible it got broke and Dad chucked it.

    Ian

    ReplyDelete
  5. Luvly Jubbly. How far from engaging them are the Luftwaffe?

    Gerry, making engine noises!!

    ReplyDelete

Work in hand

The RULES!

No more than 3 things on the PAINTING table at once. Nothing new added until something is finished.

PREPARATION work is done when I don't fancy detail painting. Cleaning up, converting, undercoating etc.

PLANNING is expressions of interest or things that have inspired me to be created with no definite timescale as yet.


On the PAINTING TABLE
10mm ACW, 28mm Stradiots

On the PREPATION table.
ACW Terrain, Egyptian and Sudanese troops for the Sudan

In the PLANNING
Death in the Dark continent stuff
Pulp Alley