Picking up those brushes again.

Hi and welcome to the occasional mutterings of Dave Doc, a military modeller and some time gamer. Gaming and model making has given me a real education, History & Geography(obvious really), Artistry, Politics, Economics, Logistics, Project Management -you try building miniature armies without the last 3.

I will use the blog to record my creations & the odd occasion I actually do some gaming.

I have always been inspired by the aesthetic side of gaming. Playing on well constructed terrain using excellently painted units is always a joy.

Saturday, 9 November 2019

Sudan - Something a bit different . Making Movies

As the title says , it’s been an interesting week. A little while ago I was contacted by a film company enquiring if I could assist with shooting scenes in miniature for the battle of Omdurman. After some too-ing and froing on the practicalities it came to fruition this last week. There were of course some compromises to be made as this was 1898 , not earlier in the Sudan . The artistic intention was to show the real mass of the native forces against the might of Victorian firepower and its ultimate effects . 

Omdurman was a very on sided battle with around 50 British dead , versus 12,000 of the Kalifas forces . It was real imposition of European ways into Africa .

The camp and Zariba 
We used around 20kg of two types of sand to ensure all the bases were properly concealed, plus we mixed in two blends of green scatter and bit of clump foliage to break things up. We were using 1/2 & 1 inch brushes to ensure the sand was spread around and blended in and cleared off the figures ... mindi am still finding sand in things!



The mass advances toward the Zariba 
The Cameron’s man the Zariba 


Cavalry advances 



I had previously added in some specifics for 1898 , particularly the maxim guns , and a powerful steamer . 


The first full set up . 


The cavalry charge 


The gunboat brings its firepower to bear .


And now some behind the scenes shots


Studios des Paris - we were in studio 7 . The studio was set up by Luc Besson , yes him of Leon..


The cavern that was studio 7 .. ready for the crew to set up. lighting and camera

Myself , MartinC and JamesM setting up under the lights .. 

Due to issues with camera wobble we had to change the set up to a lower table .. that kept us busy..
The blue screens are to provide background for post CGI processing to add back ground later. The camera was set up.


Camera set for aerial shots 
Benjamin steers the camera - Rolling...

Action!



We had to rearrange and reset as the director and cinematographer asked for things to be moved, filled out etc .We also had some license to set up and call out any issues we saw. 
Setting up scenes .

Damn.. I think corporal Jones needs moving a 1/4 of an inch.... myself and Martin dealing with fine details 

Overall it was a great experience and a real behind the scenes look at the craft and graft required to make the stuff we see on our screens .

My thanks must go to James (his post is here ) and Martin without who’s help and friendship this  would not have been possible ... cheers guys . 

We don’t know when it will air , likely to be years  - it may never get off the cutting room floor .. - but hopefully it will . 























32 comments:

  1. Fantastic! What a great experience.

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  2. What a fabulous experience to be part of although it doesn't look kind to the knees!
    When does the shown air?
    Best wishes,
    Jeremy

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    1. Cheers , we’re we’re indeed glad of kneepads .. and painkillers

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  3. What a wonderful thing to be part of and a fitting tribute to one of my favourite collections.

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  4. A very impressive opportunity and well deserved too.

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  5. Great stuff Dave, Martin filled me in on the adventure! Quite epic makes you realise the actual money that goes into production of tv programmes

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    1. Thanks Matt .. indeed it’s an eye opener!

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  6. Was a brilliant few daY's, wouldn't have missed it for the world.

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  7. Great experience Dave, hard work tho. I've a tan from working under those lights. And sand keeps turning up in odd places.

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    1. Cheers James - your contribution was great and much appreciated - your eye for extra detail really helped .

      Yes - I have had to have the car cleaned out as it was looking like it does after visiting the beach!

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  8. That must have been a fantastic experience. Hope your excellent stuff does not end up on the cutting room floor.

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    1. Paul, indeed it was .. from the playback we saw it should look epic.. particularly with the extra effects added

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  9. What a fascinating experience, and a brilliant way to display your amazing project. Well done Dave!

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    1. Cheers.. your steamer Captain was there!

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  10. An achievement to be recognised. Well deserved outing for the collection.

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  11. Great work Dave, you’ve done the hobby proud. And it look bloody awesome alllaid out!

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  12. A great experience for you chaps! :)

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    1. Thanks Tamsin. It was something different alright

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  13. What a fantastic experience for you Dave. I imagine that you also picked up a few tips on lighting and photography - there's some serious equipment there.

    Oh, and the minis look awesome.

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    1. It was indeed Jim. I was able to use some experience taking pictures with Duncan Macfarlane for WI at the WHC.. but it was certainly a step up..

      Quote f the day from the cinematographer..”fuck they are small... we thought they would be bigger !”

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  14. Spectacular and superb, what a fantastic experience, congrats!

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  15. That's something else mate, an amazing setup!

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    1. Thanks Millsy ... it certainly was something to see

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  16. Now you’re even more of a celebrity Dave! A true movie star and if it’s just through your miniatures ;-) Congratulations on what must have been a great experience.

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    1. Thanks Nick... it's been an experience right

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Work in hand

The RULES!

No more than 3 things on the PAINTING table at once. Nothing new added until something is finished.

PREPARATION work is done when I don't fancy detail painting. Cleaning up, converting, undercoating etc.

PLANNING is expressions of interest or things that have inspired me to be created with no definite timescale as yet.


On the PAINTING TABLE


On the PREPATION table.
WW2 15mm

In the PLANNING
Storage wars